SUMSQ Excel Formula

Author Zaheer    Category Formulas     Tags ,

Microsoft Excel features several built-in functions that have the ability to perform calculations. These mathematical functions are useful especially to students. You can now perform different mathematical operations with the use of the Excel’s functions. While there lots of functions in Excel, this article will provide a detailed discussion of the SUMSQ function. Also, you will be provided with some examples so that you would know how the function is used.

You should always keep in mind that each function in Excel is starts with an equal (=) sign unless the function is included inside other formulas or functions.

Basics of the SUMSQ Function in Microsoft Excel

The Excel’s SUMSQ function is used to return the sum of the squares of the supplied numeric values in the formula of the function. The formula of the SUMSQ function is:

SUMSQ (number1, number2…)

In this formula, the number1, number2… arguments are the numeric values in which the function will compute for their squares. You can supply up to 255 arguments in the formula of the SUMSQ function. The arguments can be supplied either as a value returned from another function or formula, as a cell reference containing the numeric value or even the numeric value itself.

Basic Example in Using the SUMSQ Function

For example, the following cells contain these values:

  • A1 – 1
  • A2 – 2
  • A3 – 3
  • A4 – 4

Then, type in this formula in any cell where you want the result to be displayed, =SUMSQ (A1, A2). The function will return the value which is 5.

Type in this formula in any cell, =SUMSQ (A1+A2). The function will square a numeric value that resulted from a formula. The numbers in cells A2 and A3 are added first before the getting the square of the sum: 1 + 2 = 3, then 3X3 = 9. The function will return the result which is 9.

Enter this formula in any cell, =SUMSQ (-A2/A4). The values in cells A2 and A4 are divided first before getting the result of the answer: -2/4 = – 0.5, then squaring -.5 results to 0.25. The function will return the result which is 0.25. (As you can still remember, the product of two numbers carrying a negative sign is always a positive numeric value.)

Here’s another one, type in this formula in any cell, =SUMS (A1:A4). The function will sum up the squares of the numeric values contained in cells A1 to A4. The numeric values are squared first: 1×1 = 1, 2×2 = 4, 3×3 =9 and 4×4 =16, then the function sump up the squares of the given numbers resulting to 30. The function will return the result which is 30.

Finally, enter this formula in any cell, =SUMSQ (A1+A2, A3). The function will first sum up the values in cells A1 and A2 and then squares the sum: 1 + 2 = 3, and then 3×3 = 9. Next, the function will get the square of the value in A3, 3×3 = 9. The function sums up the squares and returns a result which is 18 (9+9 = 18).

You can try the simple examples in your own spreadsheet for you to explore how the SUMSQ function is used.

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